Things tagged 'consultation'

limited to the area of Haringey Cycling Campaign:

25 issues found for 'consultation':

  • Six new permeability improvements in Camden

    Created by Jean Dollimore // 1 thread

    Camden is consulting on proposals to increase permeability for cycling in the following locations

    Laystall Street

    Mornington Terrace

    South Grove

    Chetwynd Road and Grove Terrace

    Gaisford Street and Patshull Road

    These consultations are not on Camden’s website but I will attached PDFs for each one.

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  • Coppermill area proposals

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Council says:

    In 2018, Waltham Forest Council was successful in securing initial funding from Transport for London (TfL) to develop a Liveable Neighbourhoods scheme in the Coppermill Area.

    For the past 12 months we have been engaging with residents, businesses and local accessibility groups and key stakeholders to find out what they would like to see improved. Based on this feedback we have created a set of proposals for the area. We are now starting a public consultation on our proposals and want everyone who lives or works in the area to have their say on the proposals to help shape the final improvements.

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  • Barnet Cycleway between Hornsey and North Finchley

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Barnet council says...

    Overview

    You and others in your area have a unique opportunity to benefit from Transport for London (TfL) funding to improve walking and cycling routes between Hornsey and North Finchley.

    We want to hear your views on our proposals that will transform streets in the borough. The improvements will help provide a future Cycleway between Alexandra Park in The London Borough of Haringey, through quiet streets and over the North Circular into The London Borough of Barnet; ending at North Finchley High Road A1000 amongst a busy parade of shops and cafes.

    Background

    The proposals are an important part of the Mayor of London Transport Strategy and Barnet’s ambition to get more people to walk and cycle. The proposals are guided by the Healthy Streets Approach(External link) which aims to encourage walking, cycling and public transport and make London greener, healthier and more pleasant.

    We have commissioned Sustrans Ltd(External link) as project coordinator and delivery partner for the Barnet section of the Cycleway route from Hornsey to North Finchley.

    Over the last two years Sustrans, in partnership with the council, engaged with residents in specific areas along the route to better understand local travel choices and concerns, road traffic and the quality of local streets.

    The proposals we are consulting on aim to address these issues, ensuring that improvements help to create an environment in which traffic is both reduced and slowed, and in which air quality is improved.

    What are we seeking your views on?

    This consultation is asking for your views on the draft concept designs for the route.

    Specifically, we are seeking your views on:

    • the layout of proposed street alterations within the draft concept designs
    • any comments you may have on the overall draft route.

    For more information on our proposals please read our FAQ document.

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  • Finsbury Park to Highbury Fields Cycleway (QW10)

    Created by grahamparks // 1 thread

    We are now consulting on the Finsbury Park to Highbury Fields part of a future Cycleway between Farringdon and Palmers Green which has been developed in partnership with Transport for London. This new Cycleway route has been chosen because it is already very popular with cyclists and the numbers of people using this route are likely to increase.

    Our scheme would create a greener, more pleasant space for local people and a convenient, safer and more direct cycle route for cyclists of all abilities. The proposals have been designed to improve safety and comfort for cyclists and pedestrians by reducing conflict with motorised traffic.
    The improvements include fully protected cycle tracks, greening measures, widened footways, safer junctions, pedestrian crossing points and new signs/ road markings. All of these are designed to make cycling and walking easier, safer and more enjoyable.

    This route would link to other Cycleways in the London cycling network, including a complimentary signed route to the recent improvements at Highbury Corner, and make it easier for local people of all ages to cycle and walk to local facilities such as leisure centres and shops.

    The wider cycle lanes will allow people with adapted cycles such as cargo bikes or cycles for disabled people to use the route more easily and make it safer for all vulnerable road users in line with the Vision Zero agenda, which aims to eliminate all deaths and serious injuries from our roads.
    What are Cycleways?

    Cycleways are continuous, clearly signed and convenient cycle routes which bring together all of the high-quality routes into a single London-wide network that is easy for everyone to understand and use.

    ProposalsDetailed maps are available at the bottom of the page.
    1. Blackstock Road/ Ambler Road Junction: Traffic lights would be introduced at the junction with new pedestrian crossings, providing early release for cyclists and cycle boxes on all arms. This design will significantly improve conditions for pedestrian and cyclists crossing Blackstock Road and allow cyclists to continue on the Cycleway route towards Finsbury Park. This proposal will involve the removal of a parking space on Somerfield Road and the Electric Vehicle charging point along Ambler Road would need to be relocated. The section towards Finsbury Park will be consulted on separately by Hackney Council. (see map section 1)

    2. Gillespie Road/ Avenell Road Junction: Priority at the junction would be reversed so that vehicles on Gillespie Road would give-way to vehicles on Avenell Road. This design would also raise the carriageway to footway level which would make it easier for crossing pedestrians and cyclists using the Cycleway to turn into Gillespie Road. (see map section 2)

    3. Gillespie Road Trial Arrangement: The ongoing trial point no-entry preventing traffic travelling westbound on Gillespie Road past the junction with St Thomas’s Road, is not being formally consulted on as part of the Cycleway proposals but we welcome feedback. (see map section 5)

    4. Drayton Park/ Aubert Park Junction: The existing mini-roundabout at the junction would be removed and changed to a priority (give-way) junction. The carriageway will be raised to footway level with pedestrian crossing points on all sides of the junction. This will raise awareness of the new Cycleway route and also make it easier for pedestrians to cross the road. The junction would prioritise movements on Drayton Park and traffic along Aubert Park would give-way. (see map section 3)

    5. Martineau Road – Aubert Park: Fully protected cycle facility at least 2.2m would be provided for northbound cycles between Martineau Road and Aubert Park. The proposal allows for southbound cyclists to mix comfortably with general traffic by adopting a position in the centre of the traffic lane, making them more visible to other traffic. The proposed design will maintain the existing number of parking spaces, however some parking bays would be relocated elsewhere between Martineau Road and Aubert Park to make room for improved cycle facilities. For the purposes of consultation, two design options for protecting cyclists are being considered, which we would like you to comment on. Examples are given below to illustrate the different design options. (see map section 3)

    • Kerb protected cycle tracks: the cycle track would be at the same level as the carriageway with a kerb installed to separate vehicles and cyclists. See below example from Cycle Superhighway 2 between Stratford and Aldgate.

    • Stepped cycle tracks: The cycleway would be installed halfway between the carriageway and footway. See below example from Midland Road in LB Camden.

    6. Benwell Road – Martineau Road: Fully protected cycle facilities would be introduced in both directions on this section of Drayton Park. The cycle tracks would be at least 2m wide in each direction and will also include a small strip that will physically protect cyclists from parked vehicles. The proposed design will maintain the existing number of parking spaces and access arrangements along Drayton Park. Existing zebra crossings will be raised to footway level improving pedestrian accessibility and safety. (see map section 3,4)

    7. Benwell Road/ Drayton Park Junction: The existing junction would be converted to a ‘continental-style’ roundabout which would include protected cycle facilities throughout the junction and new cycle crossings on all arms of the junction. The design will also significantly improve conditions for pedestrians by introducing new zebra crossings on all arms, raised surface and widened footways reducing crossing distances. (see map section 5)

    8. Highbury Crescent Signed Route: A complimentary signed route is proposed to connect up to the recent improvements at Highbury Corner. (see map section 6)

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  • Camden's Clean Air Action Plan 2019-2022

    Created by Jean Dollimore // 1 thread

    Camden’s Clean Air Action Plan has been produced as part of our duty to London Local Air Quality Management. It outlines the action we will take to improve air quality in Camden between 2019 and 2022.

    Apologies for very late posting

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  • Camden - Tottenham Hale cycle route

    Created by Simon Munk // 4 threads

    At approximately 12km, this route would connect the town centres of Tottenham Hale, Seven Sisters and the Nag's Head, making it easier for people to make local journeys and use local services. The route would use both main roads and quieter back streets.

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  • Barnet LIP

    Created by Simon Still // 2 threads

    The third Mayor’s Transport Strategy (MTS) was published in March 2018 and sets out a new strategic direction for transport in London. It aims to change the way people choose to travel with an overarching vision for 80% of all trips in London to be made on foot, cycle or using public transport by 2041.

    Each London Borough has to prepare a Local Implementation Plan (LIP) containing proposals for the implementation of the MTS in its area.

    Barnet’s draft LIP includes Barnet’s transport objectives and identifies key local issues, challenges and opportunities to achieving the overarching mode share aim and nine MTS outcomes. It includes a delivery plan that sets out, in broad terms, the proposals and resources that will deliver the LIP objectives and targets associated with indicators related to the MTS outcomes.

    A number of statutory consultees will be specifically invited to comment on the draft LIP, but we want everyone who lives in or visits the borough to have an opportunity to comment too.

    Give us your views

    A copy of the draft LIP is provided here. We would particularly like your views on:

    have the main challenges and opportunities to delivering the MTS vision and outcomes been identified (pages 24-60);
    are the borough transport objectives identified in the document (pages 26-29) suitable for addressing the challenges;
    should the LIP include other major proposals or general areas of work (pages 62-74 & 80-81);
    should any other targets be identified (pages 103-110)
    Please provide your comments by email to traffic.consultations@barnet.gov.uk(External link) including LIP3 in the title

    ,or by post FAO Jane Shipman, Re, Floor 11, Barnet House, 1255 High Road, London, N20 0EJ.

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  • Enfield Transport Plan - Local Implementation Plan

    Created by Clare Rogers // 1 thread

    "The Enfield Transport Plan (ETP) outlines what we will do over the next few years to improve those parts of the transport network which the Council is responsible for. Alongside this there will be continuing maintenance and, at the other end of the scale, delivery of strategic projects, such as the new Meridian Water station.

    The core of the ETP is Enfield’s third Local Implementation Plan (LIP), which is a statutory document setting out how the Council proposes to help implement the Mayor of London’s Transport Strategy. The LIP also details how we propose to spend funding received from Transport for London (TfL).

    At the heart of the plan is improving people’s health. Our local priorities reflect this, with a focus on making travel more sustainable, active and safe:

    • Making active travel the natural choice, particularly for those trips less than 2km in length.
    • Making more school trips safe, sustainable and healthy.
    • Reducing the impact of private vehicles on our streets.
    • Making the public transport network more accessible and the
    natural choice for longer trips.
    • Maintaining our assets for the benefit of the public."

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  • Bowes CPZ

    Created by Oliver Bruckauf // 2 threads

    Parking patterns in the Bowes area have changed. Enfield Council has, in recent years, received numerous enquiries from residents of the area, and petitions covering four different streets that indicate community support for permit parking controls.

    Enfield Council is now seeking views on its proposals for a Controlled Parking Zone (CPZ.)

    Why We Are Consulting
    Enfield Council is confident that zonal parking controls will prove popular with residents and offer them greatly improved parking opportunities. Area wide zonal controls can also reduce local congestion and prompt better travel habits amongst those heading to or through the area on their daily commute.

    The Council is consulting to make residents aware of its propsals and to seek their comments before plans are finalised or taken forward.

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  • Changes to A107 Clapton Common Road Safety Improvements

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Part of the Wetlands 2 Wetlands route.

    TfL says:
    We are proposing improvements to the pedestrian and cycling facilities with A107 Clapton Common junctions with Craven Walk and Portland Avenue.

    A107 Clapton Common
    We would like to improve the way cyclists and pedestrians cross. We are proposing to relocate the pedestrian crossing south of Portland Avenue and install a new parallel pedestrian and cycle crossing at the junction Clapton Common junctions with Craven Walk and Portland Avenue. This new crossing for pedestrians and cyclists would make crossing easier for all users.

    Craven Walk would become one-way only (northbound) between the A107 Clapton Common Road and Belz Terrace, except for cycles.

    We also propose to remove a section of the bus lane at bus stop (CU) south of Portland Avenue on the A107 and convert this into a wider pedestrian footway to create better visibility.

    Improved Vehicular Access

    We propose to improve vehicular access on Castlewood Road, Ravensdale Road and Lingwood Road. To achieve this we would need to remove a small section of parking on either side of the carriageway. We would implement single yellow line parking restrictions, to create better visibility and accommodate turning movements.

    We also propose to implement the parking restriction times from 8.30am to 6.30pm Monday to Saturday.

    Traffic impacts

    We predict no significant impact on general traffic times.

    Cars previously turning out of Craven Walk onto A107 Clapton Common may have a slightly longer journey, although by no more than a few minutes. Bus journeys would not be impacted.

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  • Proposals for the Creation of a Major Road Network (London)

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    From the DfT:
    As part of the Transport Investment Strategy, the government committed to creating a Major Road Network (MRN).

    This consultation asks for views on:
    how to define the MRN
    the role that local, regional and national bodies will play in the MRN investment programme
    which schemes will be eligible for MRN funding

    A new MRN would help deliver the following objectives:
    reduce congestion
    support economic growth and rebalancing
    support housing delivery
    support all road users
    support the Strategic Road Network

    The creation of an MRN will allow for dedicated funding from the National Roads Fund to be used to improve this middle tier of our busiest and most economically important local authority ‘A’ roads.

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  • New London Plan 2017

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London.gov.uk says:

    What is the new London Plan?
    The London Plan is one of the most important documents for this city.
    It's a strategic plan which shapes how London evolves and develops. All planning decisions should follow London Plan policies, and it sets a policy framework for local plans across London.
    The current 2016 consolidation Plan is still the adopted Development Plan. However the Draft London Plan is a material consideration in planning decisions. It gains more weight as it moves through the process to adoption, however the weight given to it is a matter for the decision maker.

    Consultation on the draft London Plan
    Consultation on this plan is open. Comments will be publicly available. After the consultation, comments are reviewed by an inspector and you may be called in to discuss comments at the Examination in Public.

    What is an Examination in Public?
    At the end of the consultation period your comments will be reviewed by the independent Planning Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State to carry out the Examination in Public for the London Plan.
    You may be invited to discuss your comments at the Examination in Public. All comments will be made available to the public at the end of the consultation period. The legal provisions for the London Plan are in Part VIII of the Greater London Authority (GLA) Act 1999 (as amended) in sections 334 to 341. The Examination in Public is covered in Section 338.

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  • Heavy Goods Vehicles Safety Standard Permit /Direct Vision Standard

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Tfl says:

    We have undertaken research that shows that in 2015, Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) were involved in disproportionately high numbers of fatal collisions with cyclists (78 per cent) and pedestrians (20 per cent) on London’s streets, despite only making up four per cent of the overall miles driven in the Capital. The Direct Vision Standard (DVS) forms part of The Mayor, Sadiq Khan and TfL’s Vision Zero approach to reducing road danger. The DVS categorises HGVs on the level of the driver’s direct vision from the cab.

    We consulted earlier this year on the principles of a new DVS. Listening to the feedback from this consultation and working closely with industry and stakeholders we have now further developed this scheme. The Consultation report and Responses to Issues Raised document from this first phase of consultation are available to view in from the links at the bottom of this text. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    We are now seeking your views on proposals to introduce a new Safety Standard Permit Scheme as part of DVS which widens our approach beyond direct vision and includes a safe system approach to allow us to address a broader range of road danger risks.

    The proposed scheme would require all HGVs over 12 tonnes to hold a Safety Permit to operate in Greater London from 2020. HGVs will be given a rating between ‘zero-star’ (lowest) and ‘five-star’ (highest). Only those vehicles rated ‘one star’ and above would be allowed to enter of operate in London from 2020. Zero rated vehicles would only be allowed if they can prove compliance through safe system measures. By 2024 only ‘three-star’ rated HGVs and above would automatically be given a Safety Permit. HGVs rated two star and below would need to demonstrate increased safety through progressive safe system measures.

    The safe system could include specific industry recognised measures such as sensors, visual warnings and comprehensive driver training. The Safety Standard Permit scheme would evolve over time, taking into account advances in technology.

    Detailed information about the scheme and the approach in which we have arrived at our current proposals are set out in the consultation document. A full Integrated Impact Assessment is also included.

    The consultation approach
    We are undertaking a phased consultation approach at key stages of the development of the consultation proposals to implement the Direct Vision Standard:

    Phase 1 (24 January to 18 April 2017) – we set out the case for HGV driver direct vision and consulted on the Mayor of London’s outline proposals to introduce a Direct Vision Standard for HGVs in London and the principles of the Standard itself. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    Phase 2a – policy consultation (this consultation) – this current phase of consultation seeks views and feedback on the scheme proposals as outlined above and within the supporting consultation document which includes supporting technical reports including the full Integrated Impact Assessment. Feedback from this phase of consultation will be used to develop a second IIA and finalise the scheme proposals to be included in phase 2b of the consultation.

    Phase 2b - Final scheme proposals and statutory consultation (Spring/Summer 2018) – this final phase will consult on the final proposals for the HGV Safety Standard Permit Scheme, including statutory consultation on the appropriate regulatory measure to ban or restrict HGVs in London under the scheme, subject to UK Government and European Commission support and notification.

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  • London Assembly cycling infrastructure investigation

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    Over recent years, TfL policy has increasingly focused on the construction of physical cycling infrastructure on London’s roads. A change in direction towards more segregated infrastructure followed our report in 2012 recommending this approach.

    Our investigation will cover the full range of cycling infrastructure in London, with a particular focus on:

    Cycle Superhighways: a form of cycle lane, designed to make cycling safer by helping keep cyclists away from general traffic, and offer direct and continuous cycling on major routes.

    Quietways: a network of cycle routes that link key destinations, improving safety and convenience through small-scale interventions.

    Mini-Hollands: TfL schemes to invest neighbourhood-level improvements in walking and cycling, involving a range of interventions in each area.

    Cycle parking: provision of parking spaces on-street, at stations or in dedicated parking facilities.

    It is important that TfL is able to establish the effectiveness of the infrastructure it installs on London’s roads. We are concerned that to date there has been no comprehensive study of the new infrastructure’s impact on cycling safety, modal share and other road users.

    Questions to answer:

    1. What progress on new cycling infrastructure has been made under Sadiq Khan, and what are his long-term plans?
    2. Has TfL resolved the problems that delayed some cycling schemes under the previous Mayor?
    3. Has segregation delivered the anticipated benefits on the Cycle Superhighways? How many cyclists are using these routes?
    4. To what extent has segregation had negative consequences for other road users and, if necessary, how can this be mitigated?
    5. Have Quietways delivered their anticipated benefits? How many cyclists are using them?
    6. What are the differences in infrastructure between inner and outer London? How can TfL ensure infrastructure in different areas is sufficient and appropriate to the location?
    7. How will TfL’s new ‘Strategic Cycling Analysis’ help determine where and how to invest in infrastructure?
    8. How appropriate is the 400-metre target set in the draft Transport Strategy? Can we equate proximity with access?
    9. Is TfL’s approach to public engagement working effectively to improve scheme designs and meet stakeholder needs?
    10. Are Londoners sufficiently aware of the cycling infrastructure available to them, and how can awareness be increased?
    11. How is TfL using infrastructure to attract a more diverse range of people to cycle in London?
    12. Is there sufficient cycle parking in London, and is it in the right locations?
    13. How are the lessons of the Mini-Hollands and other previous cycling schemes being applied elsewhere?
    14. Should cycling infrastructure be oriented toward longer-distance commuting journeys, or more localised trips?

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  • Consultation on Wolves Lane Quieter Neighbourhood

    Created by Clare Rogers // 1 thread

    Enfield Council are consulting on this 'Quieter Neighbourhood', part of Enfield's Mini Holland, treatments for residential areas.

    Although the Wolves Lane area consisted of a much wider area during the original consultation / workshop stage, including the roads adjoining the A105, the focus is now on Tile Kiln Lane and Chequers Way only. A school street is proposed for Oakthorpe School on Tile Kiln Lane with traffic banned at school run hours, and a zebra crossing for Chequers Way north of the current informal crossing at the roundabout with Tottenhall Road.

    See the discussion thread for our thoughts as Enfield Cycling Campaign / Better Streets for Enfield.

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  • London Assembly investigation: Walking & Cycling at Outer London Junctions

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    What different approaches could TfL and London boroughs take to improve junctions and increase walking and cycling in Outer London?

    Small pockets of improvement don’t change the fact that most London streets are dominated by traffic and noise. They are hostile places even to step out into for a pint of milk.

    On behalf of the London Assembly Transport Committee, Caroline Russell AM is investigating how our streets and junctions can become more people-friendly.

    Get involved
    There are a number of specific questions the Committee is seeking to answer. Please address any questions where you have relevant views and information to share, and feel free to cover any other issues you would like the Committee to consider.

    Are there lessons to be learned from previous junction improvements?

    How can we enable more people to walk and cycle?

    How can we make our streets and junctions less hostile to people getting around by bike and on foot?

    How do you get all road users on board?

    Please email transportcommittee@london.gov.uk by August 11 and share the investigation on Twitter using #OuterLondonJunctions

    Key Facts
    The Mayor and TfL are promoting walking and cycling as a form of active travel and a way to reduce health inequalities - however, currently, over 40 percent of Londoners fall short of the recommended 150 minutes of activity per week.

    TfL research has found that people who live in Outer London tend to walk less than those who live in Inner London. Public transport coverage is lower and car ownership is higher in Outer London, with cars making up a larger share of journeys. In particular, people who live in Outer London are less likely to walk children to school, walk to see friends or relatives, and walk to pubs, restaurants and cinemas.

    In 2015:
    53 percent of Inner Londoners walked at least five journeys a week, compared to 35 percent of Outer Londoners
    47 percent of Inner Londoners walked as part of longer journeys on other forms of transport at least five times a week, compared to 41 percent of Outer Londoners

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  • London Assembly Transport Committee Bus network design, safety

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly said:
    "Buses are the busiest form of public transport in London. The city has 675 bus routes, with around 9,000 buses in operation and over 19,000 bus stops. Approximately 2.5 billion bus passenger trips are made every year, around double the number made on London Underground.
    "TfL commissions private operators to run bus services in London, awarding seven-year contracts to operate bus routes. Although bus safety (in terms of casualty numbers) has improved over recent years, there was a spike in bus collision fatalities in 2015.
    "The London Assembly Transport Committee is investigating two aspects of bus services in London: Network Design and Safety."

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  • Mayor's Transport Strategy

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Draft Mayor's Transport Strategy 2017
    On June 21 Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, published a draft of the Mayor's Transport Strategy. The document sets out the Mayor’s policies and proposals to reshape transport in London over the next 25 years.

    About the strategy

    Transport has the potential to shape London, from the streets Londoners live, work and spend time on, to the Tube, rail and bus services they use every day.

    By using the Healthy Streets Approach to prioritise human health and experience in planning the city, the Mayor wants to change London’s transport mix so the city works better for everyone.

    Three key themes are at the heart of the strategy.

    1. Healthy Streets and healthy people
    Creating streets and street networks that encourage walking, cycling and public transport use will reduce car dependency and the health problems it creates.

    2. A good public transport experience
    Public transport is the most efficient way for people to travel over distances that are too long to walk or cycle, and a shift from private car to public transport could dramatically reduce the number of vehicles on London’s streets.

    3. New homes and jobs
    More people than ever want to live and work in London. Planning the city around walking, cycling and public transport use will unlock growth in new areas and ensure that London grows in a way that benefits everyone.

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  • Seven Sisters Road Consultation

    Created by Harry Fletcher-Wood // 1 thread

    The Woodberry Down Development Team (Hackney Council, Berkeley Homes and supported by Transport for London) are consulting on "changes to Seven Sisters Road, from Green Lanes to the west and Amhurst Park to the east, as part of the on‑going regeneration of the area".

    They have offered six 'ideas':
    1) Reduce road to two lanes in either direction (one general traffic lane, one bus lane)
    2) Reduce road to two lanes (one general traffic, one bus) in either direction, but widen to three lanes at junctions
    3) Increase the number of pedestrian crossings
    4a) Add a 'pedestrian island slip' between the two carriageways
    4b) Add a wide 'pedestrian island slip' with planting and trees
    5) Segregated cycle lanes
    6) Widen bus lanes

    Different combinations are possible. For example, 1 (change traffic lanes) would be necessary for 4 (pedestrian island slip) and 5 (segregated cycle lanes). 1 (change traffic lanes), 4a (pedestrian island slip) and 5 (segregated cycle lanes) would work together, whereas 2 (change traffic lanes but keep three lanes at junction) would make pavement widening and segregated cycle lanes impossible.

    Please respond by Sunday 15th February so that Natalie and Harry can draft a response representing Hackney Cycling Campaign's position.

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